Saint Moses the Abyssinian Greek Orthodox Church

Saint Moses the Abyssinian Church is one of the oldest churches in Nablus, built in the seventeenth century on the ruins of an ancient Byzantine church and named after Saint Moses (Musa al-Habashi) from the Nile Valley area (now Ethiopia), from where he is said to have visited our country and region.
Inside the church and its yard there are five graves of priests, all of whom are from Rafidia. The church was restored twice during the twentieth century and has been recently renovated and reopened with the help and financial support of the Higher Presidential Committee of Churches Affairs.

Photo courtesy of HCC.
Photo courtesy of HCC.

It is said that Saint Moses (the Abyssinian) was a tall, black-skinned man, with a very bad reputation, who repented and became a priest after having led a sinful life that included robberies and even murder. Through the great mercy of God, however, he repented, left his band of robbers, and went to one of the desert monasteries, where he performed many wonders. Saint Moses became a model of penitence, and after some time gained admittance to the monastery. There, his austere life and the heavenly favors he received placed him in the first rank among the Fathers of the Desert. Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria, raised him to the priesthood. He died at the close of the fourth century, when he was in his seventy-fifth year, surrounded by his many disciples.

 

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